Figure of 8 cast off

   

 This transfer tool cast off on the single bed produces a stretchy cast off which is good for necks or anywhere requiring a bit of stretch..

 The cast off is started at the carriage end of the knitting, at main tension, (no loose row) at either end of the machine though you may find it easier from one end than from the other. Remove the yarn from the feeder and pull some yarn through the tension mast to slacken the tension.  Position about the first 10 needles in upper working position (UWP). 

 *Knit the first stitch by hand.

 Pull the first needle with its stitch back to non-working position. The stitch will enlarge.  If you are right handed put your left thumb nail on this stitch below the gatepeg and push this needle to holding position (HP) with your right hand. The large loop is on the shaft of the needle and cannot shrink as you are holding it.  Hold the transfer tool so the end with one prong is facing you and lying above the machine bed and the needle in holding position with the tip just behind the large loop.  Pick up the loop from behind and place it on the second needle by bringing the end of the tool towards you and down and dropping the stitch onto the needle from above. You have made the figure of 8 and can see it around the two needles.  Gently pull the yarn so that the figure of 8 is firm around the needles. 

 Knit the second needle by hand and repeat from * as for the first needle to the end.  When you get to the end of the row break off the yarn and pull the end through the last stitch.  As you use up the needles in UWP bring more out.   The yarn needs to be slack so pull more through as needed.  You can drop the cast off stitches off some of the needles in holding position if you wish as it can make casting off the rest of the row easier - but always leave a few in HP  Remove the knitting from the machine by gently pulling it towards you.  If you have to stop mid row either return the needles in UWP to WP or hang the 3 pronged transfer tool onto the needles nearest to the casting off to stop them falling off. Be careful of the needles in HP.

 Frances Murray

 

 
   

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